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2 edition of Population genetics of self-incompatibility in "Papaver rhoeas l". found in the catalog.

Population genetics of self-incompatibility in "Papaver rhoeas l".

Stephen O"Donnell

Population genetics of self-incompatibility in "Papaver rhoeas l".

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  • 35 Currently reading

Published by University of Birmingham in Birmingham .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D.) - University of Birmingham, Dept of Genetics, 1983.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13796505M

EVALUATION OF SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY (SI ALLELES) AMONG SOME GENOTYPES IN ALMOND (Prunus dulcis) Naema A. Altanger1, 2, Nahed A. Rashed1 and Mohamed M. Sourour3 1Genetic Resources Dep. Desert Research Center, Egypt. 2Egyptian Deserts Gene Bank, Desert Research Center, Egypt 3Faculty Environmental Agricultural Science, Alarish University, Size: KB. Full text of "Natural Hybridization And Evolution" See other formats. The subject of this volume is the reproductive biology of plants. A steadily growing interest in this field is the result of at least two factors, as pointed out with great foresight by one of the driving forces in the field, H.E Linskens (Linskens ): most of the food consumed by humans takes the form of plant reproductive parts, and molecular biology now provides pow­ erful tools for. Trans-acting small RNA determines dominance relationships in Brassica self-incompatibility. Nature Tarver, J. E., & Donoghue, P. C. J. The trouble with topology: Phylogenies without fossils provide a revisionist perspective of evolutionary history in topological analyses of diversity. Syst. Biol.

Full text of "Plant Systematics Third Edition An Intergrated Approach" See other formats.


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Population genetics of self-incompatibility in "Papaver rhoeas l". by Stephen O"Donnell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Self-incompatibility (SI) is a general name for several genetic mechanisms in angiosperms, which prevent self-fertilization and thus encourage outcross and should not be confused with genetically controlled physical or temporal mechanisms that prevent self-pollination, such as heterostyly and sequential hermaphroditism (dichogamy).

In plants with SI, when a pollen. population. Genetics8. Foote HCC, Ride JP, Franklin-Tong VE, Walker EA, Lawrence MJ, In Papaver rhoeas, the pistil S locus product is a Author: Deborah Charlesworth.

A region of the Papaver rhoeas genome encompassing part of the self-incompatibility S(1) locus has been cloned and sequenced. The clone contains the gene encoding the stigmatic component of the response, but does not contain a putative pollen by:   Abstract.

The self‐incompatibility (SI) response in Papaver rhoeas depends upon the cognate interaction between a pollen‐expressed receptor and a stigmatically expressed ligand. The genes encoding these components are situated within the S‐ order for SI to be maintained, the genes encoded by the S‐locus must be co‐inherited with no recombination Cited by:   Lawrence MJ, O'Donnell S () The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism inPapaver rhoeas III.

The number and frequency of S-alleles in two further natural populations. Heredity – Google ScholarCited by: Campbell, J.M.

and Lawrence, M.J. (a) The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism in Papaver rhoeas I. The number and distribution of S Cited by: 1.

Introduction. The Papaver genus in the Papaveraceae family comprises species distributed in various countries around the world, from central and south Europe to temperate Asia, America, Oceania and South Africa []. Papaver rhoeas L. (corn poppy) is one of the most well-known members of this genus, easily identified by its scarlet flowers.

This species has been the Cited by: 8. Abstract. Self‐incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas involves an allele‐specific recognition between stigmatic S‐proteins and pollen, resulting in inhibition of incompatible pollen.

A picture of some of the signalling events and mechanisms involved in this specific inhibition of pollen tube growth is beginning to be built by: Identification of the pollen self-incompatibility determinant in Papaver rhoeas Article (PDF Available) in Nature () July with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Key words: Self-incompatibility, pollen gene expression, Papaver rhoeas. INTRODUCTION by the characterization and cloning of stigmatic Population genetics of self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas l.

book involved in the SI reaction in these Self-incompatibility (SI) is the most important species, comparable progress towards the outbreeding device found in the flowering by: Comparing models for S-RNase-based Self-incompatibility.

Bruce McClure Self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas: progress in understanding mechanisms involved in regulating self-incompatibility in Papaver. Vernonica E. Franklin-Tong Molecular genetics of sporophytic self-incompatibility in Ipomoea, a memberof the : $ Author(s): Paape, Timothy | Abstract: Flowering plants are able to avoid inbreeding by several genetically based mechanisms.

Gametophytic self- incompatibility (GSI) occurs when pollen is rejected in the style or on the stigma if it possesses a matching allele with either of the ovule parent's S-alleles. This mechanism typically involves a single genetic locus that is highly Author: Timothy Paape.

The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism in Papaver rhoeas L. The number and distribution of S -alleles in families from three localities.

Hered 69 – Cited by: The Papaver rhoeas S determinants confer self-incompatibility to Arabidopsis thaliana in planta Zongcheng Lin,* Deborah J. Eaves, Population genetics of self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas l. book Sanchez-Moran, F. Christopher H. Franklin, Vernonica E. Franklin-Tong† Self-incompatibility (SI) is a major genetically controlled system used to prevent inbreeding in higher plants.

C ampbell, J. M., and M. L awrence, The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism in Papaver rhoeas. The number and distribution of S-alleles in families from three localities. Heredity 69 –Cited by:   In Papaver rhoeas, S-proteins encoded by the stigma component of the S-locus interact with incompatible pollen, triggering a Ca2+-dependent signalling network2,3,4,5,6,7, resulting in the.

Self-Incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas and Functional Transfer of Papaver S-Determinants to Arabidopsis thaliana by SABINA VATOVEC A thesis submitted to The University of Birmingham for the degree of Self-incompatibility induced PCD.

The Papaver Self-Incompatibility Pollen S-Determinant, PrpS, Functions in Arabidopsis thaliana Author links open overlay panel Barend H.J. de Graaf 1 2 5 Sabina Vatovec 1 5 Javier Andrés Juárez-Díaz 1 5 Lijun Chai 1 Kreepa Kooblall 1 3 Katie A.

Wilkins 1 Huawen Zou 1 4 Thomas Forbes 1 F. Christopher H. Franklin 1 6 Vernonica E. Franklin-Tong 1 6Cited by: The Papaver Self-Incompatibility Pollen S-Determinant, PrpS, Functions in Arabidopsis thaliana Barend H.J.

de Graaf,1,2,5 Sabina Vatovec,1,5 JavierAndre´sJua´rez-Dı´az,1,5 LijunChai,1 KreepaKooblall,1 3 A key feature of SI in Papaver rhoeas is the triggering of pro.

The Papaver genus in the Papaveraceae family comprises species distributed in various countries around the world, from central and south Europe to temperate Asia, America, Oceania and South Africa []. Papaver rhoeas L. (corn poppy) is one of the most well-known members of this genus, easily identified by its scarlet flowers.

This species has been the symbol for Cited by: 8. Molecular investigations of the control and elicitation of self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas L. 22nd Aharon Katzir-Katchalsky Conference on Plant Molecular Biology, Köln, Germany, Oct Self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas: a novel S-gene whose pollen response is.

Self-incompatibility (SI) is a genetic mechanism which prevents self-fertilisation via the recognition and rejection of self pollen. In the self-incompatible species Papaver rhoeas L., rejection of incompatible pollen is achieved through interaction of the female and male S-determinants, PrsS and PrpS, respectively.

These S RNases have been demonstrated to confer self-incompatibility through transformation experiments (Lee et al., ; Murfett et al., ). In Papaver, the stigmatic S gene encodes a small protein (Foote et al., ) that triggers a Ca 2+ -based signal transduction cascade resulting in the S -specific inhibition of incompatible pollen.

The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism in Papaver rhoeas. The number and distribution of S-alleles in families from three by: Self‐incompatibility in Arabidopsis lyrata is sporophytically controlled by the multi‐allelic S‐locus.

Self‐incompatibility alleles (S‐alleles) are under strong negative. Many higher plants use self-incompatibility (SI) mechanism to prevent inbreeding and thus encouraging out-crossing. Upon a self-challenge in Papaver rhoeas, a Ca2+-dependent-signa.

Inositide signalling Pollen Self-incompatibility Introduction Self-incompatibility (SI) is a mechanism used by many flowering plants to prevent self-pollination. In Papaver rhoeas L., var. Shirley, SI is controlled by a single, multi-allelic, gametophytically controlled S gene (Lawrence et al.

Several alleles of the stigmatic S. () The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism in Papaver rhoeas: III. The number and frequency of S-alleles in two further natural populations (R and R).

Heredity 53 – OCKENDON,D. Distribution of self-incompatibility alleles and. April REINARTZ OF SELF-INCOMPATIBILITY breeding structure of open-pollinated cultivars of brussels sprouts. Heredity O'DONNELL, S., AND M.

LAWRENCE. The population genetics of the self-incompatibility polymorphism in Papaver rhoeas. Dr Mike Wheeler joined the University of Worcester in after researching in the area of plant molecular genetics. Mike developed a strong background in the biology of cell signalling in plants, with specific research into the mechanisms of self-incompatibility in poppy and the control of polarity in pollen tubes of tobacco.

Molecular Genetics of Gametophytic Self-incompatibility in Solanaceae.- Molecular Genetics of Self-incompatibility in Nicotiana alata.- Recognition Signals and Pollen Responses in the Incompatibility Reaction in Papaver rhoeas.- Self-incompatibility Products of the Male Partner in Brassica oleracea.-   For Solanaceae type self-incompatibility, discrimination between self and nonself pollen by the pistil is controlled by the highly polymorphic S-RNase gene.

To date, the mechanism generating the allelic diversity of this gene is largely unknown. Natural populations offer a good opportunity to address this question because they likely contain different alleles that share Cited by:   Introduction.

Self‐incompatibility (SI) is a genetic system that prevents self‐fertilization in many angiosperm species (East, ; Brewbaker, ).Evolutionary transitions from SI to self‐compatibility (SC) are thought to have occurred frequently (Stebbins, ; Igic et al., ).Theoretical investigations show that SC mutants that lack functional Cited by: 7.

By A. Lundqvist. â ¢ Heteromorphic incompatibility system under disruptive selection. By D. Lewis, F.R.S. (Plate 26) â ¢ Intermorph structural differences between stigmatic papillae and pollen grains in relation to incompatibility in Plumbaginaceae.

By Rivka Dulberger (Plates ) â ¢ The genetics of self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas. Examination of pollen tube growth. Pollen tube growth was visualized using a modification of the procedures of Stoddard () and Chen ().Flowers of R. brachypus, 1 d post‐anthesis, were self‐pollinated and cross‐pollinated (interspecific) with R.

second species was chosen as it was known from other experiments to produce a high percentage of viable (filled) Cited by: 6. Physiologia Plantarum Hearn MJ, Franklin FCH, Ride JP. Identification of a membrane lycoprotein in pollen of Papaver rhoeas which binds stigmatic self-incompatibility (S-) proteins Plant Journal 9: Hiscock SJ.

Self-incompatibility in Senecio squalidus L. (Asteraceae). Annals of Botany 85 (Supplement A): Cited by: 1. Late-acting self-incompatibility in Capparis retusa (Capparaceae), a species of Chaco woodland in NE Argentina.

MARTA B. BIANCHI 1 and PETER E. GIBBS 2,3 (received: December 8, ; accepted: J ) ABSTRACT - (Late-acting self-incompatibility in Capparis retusa, a species of the Chaco woodland in NE Argentina).The reproductive biology of Capparis retusa.

Programmed cell death (or PCD) is the death of a cell in any form, mediated by an intracellular program, and is also referred to as Cellular Suicide. PCD is carried out in a biological process, which usually confers advantage during an organism's example, the differentiation of fingers and toes in a developing human embryo occurs because cells between the fingers.

The most important goal of this book, therefore, has been to present molecular genetics, population genetics and applied molecular ecology in a logical and uncomplicated -- but not oversimplified.

SC and one leaky SI population as maternal plants, and one additional fully SI population for among population crosses (Figure 1a). Our sam-pling thus represents the single transition to SC that has been found for L.

cavanillesii (Voillemot & Pannell, ). | Hand-pollination crosses. The genetics of self-incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas. Proc R Soc Lond B Biol Sci. ; – [Google Scholar] Demauro MM. Relationship of breeding system to rarity in the Lakeside daisy (Hymenoxys acaulis var.

glabra). Conserv Biol. ; – [Google Scholar] Florida Ziziphus Recovery Team Florida Ziziphus Recovery Team. The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of morphogenesis, sexual reproduction, and cellular responses to extracellular stimuli. Changes in the cellular architecture are often assumed to require actin-binding proteins as stimulus-response modulators, because many of these proteins are regulated directly by binding to intracellular second messengers or signaling .The population genetics of situations involving such interacting genes, where recombinants suffer reduced fitness, predicts that the invasion of the population by the second mutation will be affected by the recombination frequency between the two loci as well as its advantage in the presence of the first one (Charlesworth and Charlesworth b Cited by: